Sun Dried Tomato Almond Pesto Pasta with Chicken

Sometimes I think it’s a scandal that sun dried tomatoes don’t cost more. I’ve never made them myself (though, living in the Phoenix area, we’re certainly not short on sun…or dryness…or tomatoes), but I do have a dim sense of how much time and effort go into the end product of these shrivelly red strips. The process goes something like this: 1. Pick tomatoes 2. Wash tomatoes 3. Cut tomatoes 4. Season tomatoes 5. Dry tomatoes in the sun for days on end 6. Package tomatoes. Seems like an awful lot of work–and an awful lot of tomatoes, seeing as how they lose around 90% of their original weight and shrink down to less than half their original size upon drying.

Yet there they are, a whole bag of them for only $3.00 at Trader Joe’s. Isn’t our food system strange?

Despite the seemingly inverse relationship between cost and effort in sun dried tomatoes, I for one am quite thankful for their relative inexpensiveness, because I adoooooore them. Chewy, brightly colored, and tangy-sweet, I happen to think they bring their A-game to any dish they grace.

And wouldn’t you know it, they make a pretty spectacular main ingredient in pesto.

This Sun Dried Tomato Almond Pesto Pasta with Chicken took its place on our family’s weeknight dinner plan last week, and it’s definitely an entree I’ll be making again. Whole grain spaghetti, olive oil, tomatoes, and almonds place it squarely in the Mediterranean Diet category–a category I’ve been known to harp on relentlessly for its many health benefits. (By the way, didja see the new U.S. News and World Report ranking of diets for 2017? The Mediterranean Diet comes in at the top of nearly every category they analyzed.)

Health benefits aside, this chicken pasta boasts excellent taste and can be whipped up in about 30 minutes. Add it to your meal plan this week!


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Sun Dried Tomato Almond Pesto Pasta with Chicken
A Mediterranean chicken dish packed with the healthy goodness of tomatoes, olive oil, and almonds.
Course Main Dish, pasta
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
Course Main Dish, pasta
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
Instructions
Make the pesto:
  1. Add tomatoes, almonds, olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic to the bowl of a food processor. Process until nearly smooth, then taste and add salt and pepper to your liking. Set pesto aside.
Make the pasta and chicken:
  1. Make the spaghetti according to package directions.
  2. Meanwhile, season chicken on both sides with basil, oregano, salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  3. In a large nonstick skillet, heat 1 Tbsp. olive oil over medium-high heat. Add seasoned chicken and cook about 4 minutes per side or until internal temperature reaches 165 degrees F.
  4. Serve immediately: assemble entree with any combination of spaghetti, pesto, and chicken you like!
Recipe Notes

A Love Letter to Food Original Recipe.

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Lemony Green Beans with Almonds and Feta

Three ways you know you’ve found the best green bean recipe ever:

  1. You make it more than once.
  2. When you serve it at Thanksgiving, it disappears to the last bean.
  3. You actually sneak it out of the fridge to snack on it at night.

Or, perhaps all of the above…because all of these things have been true in our household with these Lemony Green Beans with Almonds and Feta. Who’da thunk a green bean side dish could be so appealing?

I featured this recipe on A Love Letter to Food’s Facebook page during my annual Healthy Thanksgiving Countdown as an alternative to the usual green bean casserole. To take my own advice, I decided to make it for the Thanksgiving dinner we attended with friends. It turned out better than I could have hoped, the beans pan-steamed to crispy crunachability and the feta and toasted almonds soaking up the lemony, garlicky dressing. When everyone was served at dinner, nary a bean was left.

On the heels of this success, I served this again at Christmas dinner. Even my 6-year-old fought me to eat the leftovers–cold. That’s a good sign.

Is it weird that eating this makes me think of the Gollum quote from The Hobbit:

“Is it nice, my preciousss? Is it juicy? Is it scrumptiously crunchable?”

Because yes, it is. And that beats green bean casserole any day, if you ask me.

 


Print Recipe
Lemony Green Beans with Almonds and Feta
Crisp-tender green beans tossed with a lemony dressing and sprinkled with toasted almonds and feta make an incredible side dish!
Course Side Dish
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
Course Side Dish
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
Instructions
  1. Toast the almonds one of two ways: either bake them for 3 minutes at 325 degrees or heat a large skillet over medium heat and cook almonds, stirring occasionally, until toasted. Set aside.
  2. Heat a large skillet over medium heat, then add green beans, water, and 1/4 tsp. salt. Cover and cook 7-10 minutes, stirring periodically. Uncover and increase heat to medium-high. Continue to cook another 3-5 minutes or until water has evaporated and beans are crisp-tender and bright green. Remove from heat.
  3. Meanwhile, make the dressing: whisk together olive oil, dijon, lemon juice, garlic, red pepper flaked, and black pepper.
  4. When beans are done cooking, toss with toasted almonds, lemon dressing, and half the feta. Spread on a platter or serving dish and sprinkle with remaining feta. Serve immediately.
Recipe Notes

Adapted from Cookie and Kate.

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12 Small Diet Changes for a Healthier New Year

One of the foundational tenets of my nutrition philosophy is that small changes add up. When it comes to New Year’s resolutions, I’m never one to recommend a wholesale diet overhaul. Spoiler alert: it doesn’t work, for diet or any other aspect of life. You’ve probably experienced this yourself. When we jump in the deep end, all we get is wet. Plenty of research shows that when people achieve extreme weight loss in a short period of time, it doesn’t last. If you make drastic, impossible-to-maintain changes in January, by about March, the scenario looks something like this:

Instead of a quick-fix mentality, as a nutritionist, I’m much more a proponent of small, realistic changes for long-term results. If you’re considering making New Year’s resolutions for your health as 2017 draws to a close, ask yourself what you can actually incorporate into your lifestyle. Maybe you’re ready for a measurable weight loss goal, but maybe just a handful of tiny, doable changes to your diet could add up to net benefit.

Here are 12 tiny food swaps to try in 2018 for better nutrition and better health:

1. Choose whole wheat flour instead of white

Whole wheat flour has more fiber, a better glycemic index, and keeps you fuller longer. Even if all you do is substitute half the all-purpose flour for whole wheat in baking recipes, you’ll be doing yourself a favor. Check out these baked good recipes for inspiration!

2. Go meatless one day a week

Oh, the joys of going meatless! No, seriously. Abstaining from meat one day a week allows you to replace animal products with plant products, always an excellent choice for your health. Check out this in-depth defense of eating less meat.

3. Swap applesauce for butter in baking

This is the sneakiest, easiest healthy baking substitution I know of. Yes, using applesauce in place of butter may change texture in certain baked goods, so I wouldn’t recommend it for, say, brownies or cookies, but I’ve had almost entirely excellent results making this swap in muffins and quick breads.

4. Where possible, use olive oil instead of butter

The hype is real. Olive oil’s monounsaturated fats truly do your heart good. (Not that saturated fat is something to fear as much as we used to think–new studies are casting doubt on some long-held beliefs about the connection between sat-fat and heart disease. Personally, I just think a bit more research is needed before I’d advise throwing caution to the wind.)

5. Drink sparkling water + juice/lemonade instead of soda

As much as we love sugar, there’s no getting around the fact that it’s flat-out bad news for our health.

Here’s a super thorough, rather damning fact sheet on all the damage sweet drinks do on American public health. Not ready to kick the soda habit entirely? Go halvsies by mixing sparkling water with juice, lemonade, or another sweetened beverage for a small, attainable change.

6. Treat yourself with dark chocolate instead of milk chocolate

This interesting infographic from Prevention.com shows the differences between dark and milk chocolate. 

Bottom line: dark chocolate makes the overall better choice for its lower sugar content and higher fiber and iron.

7. Snack on popcorn instead of chips

Crunchy? Salty? Thoroughly snackable? Check, check, check. Popcorn offers much the same snacking experience as chips with less fat, fewer calories, and (if you go with the unsalted variety) lower sodium.

8. Try a milk alternative

Cow’s milk has plenty going for it, with its high levels of calcium and protein. But keeping an open mind on milk alternatives like almond, soy, or rice milk could serve you well if cutting fat and calories are a part of your pursuit of healthy eating. Some food for thought for comparison:

From MyFitnessPal.com

9. Make salads with spinach instead of iceberg

If you ask me, iceberg lettuce earns its name: it’s little better than eating ice. Look down the line items of its nutrition facts and you’ll see zero after zero. For better nutritional value in your salads, choose fresh spinach. Your body will thank you for the dose of vitamins A and K and fiber boost, for only 7 calories per 1 cup.

10. Choose a fruit popsicle or frozen yogurt instead of ice cream

Ok, I know, easier said than done. Given the choice, I’d prefer the velvety deliciousness of ice cream over a popsicle. But two suggestions: one, when you stock the healthier option in your freezer, you’re a whole lot more likely to eat it. And two, making your own creamy popsicles can be a fun motivator to ditch the ice cream.

11. Go with yogurt + honey on waffles or pancakes instead of butter + syrup

The outside-the-box switch of yogurt for butter provides probiotics and lower fat with a similarly creamy texture. Not bad!

12. Experiment with fish or beans in burgers instead of beef

All burgers aren’t created equal. Slash calories and add vitamins and healthy fats by ditching beef in burgers in favor of beans or fish. Here are some recipes to get you started.

Wishing you a happy and healthy new year!

Cranberry Salsa

How often do you eat cranberries in their fresh, raw form? It seems to go without saying that sweetened dried cranberries have pretty well monopolized the Cranberry Market in recent years, edging out their plump, juicy originators by a long shot.  I’d wager few of us ever go around eating raw cranberries as our go-to fruit of choice. As a matter of fact, when my six-year-old daughter saw them in our fruit crisper the other day and asked to try one, I told her to do so at her own risk. Raw cranberries are so stinking tart, they’re almost inedible on their own.

Not surprisingly, it took about two seconds before she made a horrible face and spit it into the trash.

That’s why this Cranberry Salsa–which I had the fresh cranberries in the fridge for–is so special. It features raw cranberries combined with apple, jalapeño, red onion, and a couple of other fresh ingredients for an unexpected, interesting appetizer that’s sure to be a hit at holiday parties. (It was at mine last night! The bowl I served this in was practically licked clean.)

Being a nutritionist, I’m a bit self-conscious about the food I serve when I entertain. Maybe no one is thinking about it but me, but I feel like my title obligates me to make at least some fairly healthy options for my guests. Plus, the nutritionist in me likes to offer allergy-friendly options for friends and family in the “something-free” club. This salsa fit the bill for both, since it’s vegan, gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free–basically everything-free, since it’s made entirely with fresh fruits, sugar, and salt. Heck, it’s even RAW, if you’re into that, too.

Oh, and it’s easy. And make-ahead. And a balanced blend of sweetness and spice. And seasonal.

Can you tell I’m sold? Give this one a try for any upcoming Christmas parties and tell me how it goes!

 


Print Recipe
Cranberry Salsa
This Cranberry Salsa is a festive, healthy, allergy-friendly holiday appetizer.
Instructions
  1. In the bowl of a food processor, process the sugar until very fine (to create superfine sugar). Pour into a serving bowl and set aside.
  2. Place cranberries, apple, red onion, and jalapeño in the food processor and process until the mixture reaches a finely chopped pico de gallo-type consistency. Add to the bowl with the sugar and stir to combine.
  3. Add orange zest and juice, lime juice, and salt and stir to combine. Cover and chill 2-24 hours. Stir in cilantro just before serving.
Recipe Notes

Adapted from Home is Where the Boat Is, who adapted it from Southern Living.

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Cinnamon Sweet Potato Muffins

I’ll be honest and say I had pretty low expectations when I decided to make sweet potato muffins. In terms of baking, sweet potatoes have always seemed to me like pumpkin’s stringy-haired, less charming step-sister. I have no evidence to back up this notion. Maybe it’s just that in this country, in all the months that end in -ber, pumpkin gets all the glory in baked goods, while sweet potatoes dutifully play side dish. Probably there’s a Pumpkin Baking Lobby at work beneath this phenomenon.

At any rate, sometimes it’s good to get out of a rut, even if it’s just a pumpkin baking rut. So when I realized I had a heaping helping of leftover cooked sweet potatoes nobody in my family was chomping at the bit to consume, I went hunting for a recipe to repurpose them as breakfast. Am I glad I did? Well, I’ll just say, Cinnamon Sweet Potato Muffins, that…

These muffins come out with flavor as bright as their color. A hint of orange zest in the recipe adds just the right counterpoint to the heartier tubers’ taste. And despite the heft of sweet potatoes’ texture, these are light, moist, and even–dare I say–fluffy? With a dusting of cinnamon sugar on top, I’m kind of sad I only made about a dozen.

So there you have it. I’m a sweet potato baking convert. Are you? Next time you have extra cooked sweet potatoes leftover, remember to try out this recipe, and I think you will be in no time!

 


Print Recipe
Cinnamon Sweet Potato Muffins
These Cinnamon Sweet Potato Muffins will make you a sweet potato baking convert! They're surprisingly light, not too sweet, and only 150 calories each.
Course breakfast
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20-25 minutes
Servings
muffins
Course breakfast
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20-25 minutes
Servings
muffins
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl, combine 1 Tbsp. sugar and 1 tsp. cinnamon. Set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Grease 14 muffin cups with cooking spray.
  3. In a small bowl, combine whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, salt, 1/2 tsp. cinnamon, nutmeg, and baking powder.
  4. In a large bowl, mix eggs, sugar, orange extract or zest, oil, and milk. Add the sweet potatoes and mix until thoroughly combined.
  5. Add dry ingredients to wet ingredients and mix. Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups. Sprinkle tops with cinnamon-sugar mixture.
  6. Bake 20-25 minutes or until the tops spring back when touched. Store in an airtight container.
Recipe Notes

Adapted from Williams Sonoma.

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